Виртуальный семинар «Ключевые опережающие научные инициативы»
при поддержке НИЯУ МИФИ

Archived VideoPanels (2011-2013)

Sessions below are arranged in the chronological order.






VP1: Panel Discussion on the BICA Challenge

If you cannot play the movie below in your browser, you can try:
- download the movie: bicavp20110506.mov.zip
- download bicavp20110506.mov.zip from https://public.me.com/samsonovich (get passwd)
- play it directly from Vimeo: http://vimeo.com/23378186
- play it from YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7apAYP4_M6Q







VP2: Paper Presentations








VP3: Panel Discussion on Metacognition



Download this video (560 Mb)




VP4: Panel Discussion on Emotional AI, Part A

  • Date and Time: February 8th, 2012 (Wednesday), started at 10:15 Eastern Time, duration 20 min
  • Panelist: Rony Novianto (IBM PhD Fellowship Awards Holder, Australian Endeavour Awards Holder, www.ronynovianto.com)
  • Host & Moderator: Alexei Samsonovich
  • Topic: Emotional AI
  • Agenda: This Videopanel is intended to help with writing a seminal vision paper with a tentative title "The emergence of emotional artificial intelligence" for the inaugural issue of Elsevier's BICA. There were a number of talks and discussions on this topic at BICA 2011. Therefore, it seems sensible to invite those authors and presenters to write a collective paper. Given that the topic is highly controversial, after some initial discussions it was decided to divide the paper into sections - one for each co-author or group - representing particular views, theories and schools in terms of answers to one and the same list of questions. The introduction and conclusions will be collectively edited by all. Therefore, the agenda for this multi-part Videopanel includes 3 main themes:
  1. What schools of thought, theories or individual views on emotions in AI will be represented in each section, and by whom?
  2. What common set of questions should be addressed by each two-page section of the 18-page paper? A candidate list is given below.
  3. What are your brief preliminary ideas of answers to those questions, and (if the time allows) your criticism of others? Can we come to any constructive conclusion - or should we just conclude that we all mutually disagree?
  • Questions:
  1. How the following notions differ from each other, and how do they interact? Emotion, affect, appraisal, arousal, motivation, feeling, mood, desire, preference, subjective experience, quale (qualia), ...
  2. What is the taxonomy of emotions (assuming that we can use the word)?
  3. How do emotions of different agents affect each other in a social context?
  4. Why should computer scientists study emotions?
  5. What VR paradigms can be used for modeling studies of emotional interactions in social groups?
  6. In what sense should AI be emotionally intelligent?
  7. What approach should be taken for implementation of emotional intelligence in AI?
  8. In the last two questions, what about higher or complex emotions? (examples: pride, shame, resentment, compassion, humor)
[ download audio: vp20120208.mp3, 38mb ]





VP5: Panel Discussion on Emotional AI, Part B

  1. How the following notions differ from each other, and how do they interact? Emotion, affect, appraisal, arousal, motivation, feeling, mood, desire, preference, subjective experience, quale (qualia)...
  2. What can you say about the taxonomy of emotions (assuming that we can use the word)?
  3. How do emotions of different agents affect each other in a social context?
  4. Why should computer scientists study emotions?
  5. In what sense should AI be emotionally intelligent? And emotional itself?
  6. What is your vision for the next 50 years of emotional AI?
View clips separately with better sound: [ Clip 1] , [ Clip 2 ]; [ download audio: vp20120209.mp3, 90mb ]





VP6: Panel Discussion of the paper on LIDA & GWT


  1. In what sense can we say that LIDA implements the Global Workspace Theory?
  2. In LIDA, the global workspace theory is used for action selection. Why not use it for sensory perception, language understanding and production, problem solving, etc.?
  3. Does the global workspace theory really explain consciousness?
  4. Is there any connection between the functional consciousness implemented in LIDA and the phenomenal consciousness?

Or, watch it on YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/embed/WilYeIfsthQ?rel=0





VP7: Discussion of the paper by C. Eliasmith et al. (2012) Science 338: 1202-1205

  • Date and Time: March 8th, 2013 (Friday), started at 2:35 PM Eastern Time, duration 28 min
  • Panelists: Chris Eliasmith (Philosophy, SDE, CRCTN, and CTN, U Waterloo) and Terry Stewart (CNRG, CTN, U Waterloo)
  • Leaders-Moderators: Mahan Mollajafar (Senior, Neuroscience, College of Humanities & Social Sciences, George Mason U) and Omead Freshtvadi (Junior, Psychology, College of Humanities & Social Sciences, George Mason U)
  • Host: Alexei Samsonovich
  • Topic: Spaun Paper Discussion
  • Title: A large-scale model of the functioning brain
  • Authors: Chris Eliasmith, Terrence C. Stewart, Xuan Choo, Trevor Bekolay, Travis DeWolf, Yichuan Tang, and Daniel Rasmussen
  • Published in: Science 338: 1202-1205 (2012)
  • Abstract: A central challenge for cognitive and systems neuroscience is to relate the incredibly complex behavior of animals to the equally complex activity of their brains. Recently described, large-scale neural models have not bridged this gap between neural activity and biological function. In this work, we present a 2.5-million-neuron model of the brain (called “Spaun”) that bridges this gap by exhibiting many different behaviors. The model is presented only with visual image sequences, and it draws all of its responses with a physically modeled arm. Although simplified, the model captures many aspects of neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, and psychological behavior, which we demonstrate via eight diverse tasks.
  • Discussion Agenda: To address questions listed below that were prepared by the moderators.
  1. Has there been any recent result or progress made based on your project?
  2. What do you think is the biggest scientific contribution of your work?
  3. Can your model still work if changes were made to settings and environment?
  4. Do you believe your model is robust or flexible enough to handle a different paradigm without adjustment (e.g. processing two-digit numbers)? If not, then how do you rank its performance compared to human performance?
  5. Do you believe that attention control can allow your model to succeed in circumstances when an unexpected stimulus (e.g., laser pointer) is introduced during the task, or the target stimulus is moved to a side of the visual field?
  6. Why do you believe that it is important to have spiking neurons or, more generally, neurons as the basis elements of your model, while your paradigm is set to perform a certain task or produce a certain behavior?
  7. In your paper, you were able to kill neurons and show robustness of the model performance. Can your model also display robustness with respect to neurogenesis? Can it make use of newly generated neurons?
  8. Do you believe your model is an essential step in science or a sidetrack?
  9. Is your model sufficiently accurate to generate valid predictions, as a model of the human brain? Or to display realistic adaptation to unexpected conditions? Will it reveal unexpected new information about the brain?
  10. How useful or effective can your model be in simulations of neurological disorders and their treatment (e.g. Parkinson, Alzheimer’s)?
  11. Your model only includes 2.5 million neuron, while the actual brain contains about 100 billion neurons. With the small fraction of neurons represent in your model, how valid can be its simulation?
  12. With respect to other projects, like the Blue Brain project of IBM or the Cognitive Computation project, both representing a greater scale of the number of neurons compared to Spaun, what makes your model better and more interesting?
  13. Can your model reproduce emotions?

Or, watch it on Vimeo: http://player.vimeo.com/video/61374659





VP8: Paper discussion with Stephen Kosslyn

(a virtual guest appearance in Psyc317 at George Mason University)

Or, watch it on YouTube:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S8OwLmVZwWU&feature=youtu.be